Maybe, Just Maybe, She Should Actually Listen

(Note to blog administrators: I realize this post is a little off the beaten path from some others. It's written from a perspective that others may not fully understand. But, I felt compelled to write this because I want to be an advocate for my son and the millions of others afflicted with diabetes. I will understand if you do not publish it. I may post it on my own blog "My Son Has Diabetes" if you don't publish it here. Kate's dismissive attitude of her children's behavior has always bothered me but when she uses a made up medical excuse it crosses the line. Thanks for reading, Penny)


I must address the "low blood sugar" thing before my head explodes. I am so sick and tired of Kate using low blood sugar as an excuse for her children behaving like , well frankly, behaving like children.



I have heard Kate use this excuse repeatedly. When she used it on the latest "Free Day at Sesame" episode it was the proverbial straw that broke the camel's back. It seems that if Kate's children don't act exactly like she thinks they should and it's anywhere near snack or meal time she blames it on a low sugar. It can't be that her children have feelings or are tired of being around her or tired of hearing her diss their dad. It can't be that they are normal children with normal pancreases that for whatever reason feel the need to express how they feel.



My reasons for feeling this way may be different than others. While it is another way that Kate dismisses her children's feelings or actions with her flippant attitude, it is much more than that.


My six year old son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was 3 years old. The beta cells in his pancreas quit working and stopped making insulin. (Not the same as the more common and well known Type 2 diabetes.) So, he must receive insulin several times a day in order to live. Since his diagnosis he has endured around 900 needle sticks to receive insulin and another 12,000 finger sticks to check his blood sugar. Currently, he is attached to an insulin pump 24/7 to receive his insulin.


(Stay with me, I'm getting to my point.) Since he is on insulin and there is really no exact science to to how much to give and how it will work at any given time (food, stress, and exercise affect blood sugars and react with or against the insulin) he sometimes end up with an ACTUAL low blood sugar.


His low blood sugars can and do strike at any time: before, during, or after meals, while he's asleep, in the middle of a soccer game, in the middle of a test at school.... And, you know what? He doesn't kick and scream and throw a fit because of it. It makes him feel terrible, but he lets me or my husband know and we deal with it by giving him a juice box or a sugary snack to bring his sugar up so that his brain is receiving the amount of sugar it needs to function so that he doesn't have a seizure or go into a coma.


We went to the beach yesterday for a fun family vacation. This included my son's first ride on a ferry. During the ride he was standing looking out at the ocean. The huge grin on his face faded and he turned and looked at me and said, "My sugar feels low." His blood sugar was 54. (Normal for him is 80-150.) He had to drink a juice and return to the car and sit for the rest of the ride.


So, when Kate tries to excuse her children's behavior with a "they need sugar" my hackles go up. She often says activities are "ruined" by grass stains, ice cream, cupcake icing, gum, Jon, the list goes on and on. But, when she uses low blood sugar that's taking it too far.


My son's low sugars don't keep us from living. His blood sugars don't "ruin" anything. They do create inconvienences that my family endures so that my son can lead as normal a life as possible. When he gets whiny, as children sometimes do, I don't blame a low sugar. I actually listen to what he has to say and try to understand what the stresser might be. Or, I realize that it might be just because he's six and let's face it, unlike Kate, he's not perfect.


From now on Kate should stick with the blanket statement of "they need a nap" instead of blaming it on low blood sugar. If they actually have a low sugar as much as she says they need medical attention. Or maybe, just maybe, she should actually listen to what her children are saying and try to understand why they feel that way and quit making excuses at all.


Blog entry created via an email from
Penny.

58 comments:

Anonymous said...

What an awesome post! I totally agree and as a diabetic myself I also hate that excuse. Sometimes I don't know what she would do if there were an 'actual medical crisis' She has made the statement several times 'One of my biggest fears is becoming incapacitated because they wouldn't know what to do' WOW! Making statement like that God will humble you with that. Being a nurse you would think she had more sense than that but I guess not. I also am a teacher so I would hate to know the instructions she gives the teachers in school. Do the girls get in trouble if they get dirty at school?
I also get tired of 'We only eat organic meals' One episode Aunt Jodi had given them a sucker and she said 'Ew were they organic?' WE GET IT YOU EAT ORGANIC THINGS!!!!! But not all the time so it shouldn't be a big deal. I also wonder if the older twins get to go to friends houses or spend the night with them. Kate probably send her own snacks. Bless their hearts I at least hope they have some friends.
I also caught the episode where they were trying to pick a nanny. One of the girls came to the house and Kate made the statement 'I don't think she's comfortable with the camera's' Like it was the girls fault that all of us don't want appear on camera.
Sorry for the long post! I love your site!

Anonymous said...

Thank you for sharing your insight. You know first hand what kind of behaviors are broght about by "low blood sugar" and you are right on when you say the Gosselins are just kids being kids. Kate needs to chill out a bit.

You would think that as a nurse Kate would understand what low blood sugar is and the signs and symptoms of it. But who knows. Maybe she missed that day of nursing school.

Anonymous said...

Bravo Penny! Your careful, thoughtful explanation of what low blood sugar really means is very helpful.

Kate should be ashamed of herself for excusing her poor parenting style by blaming low blood sugar.

Anonymous said...

Penny, I am sorry you take offense to the use of "low blood sugar." I have definitely used that phrase in the past referring to both myself and my children. My understanding is that all people have fluctuations in blood sugar levels depending on how long they wait between eating. One of the first signs of low blood sugar is irritability. So while neither myself nor my children are diabetic or hypoglycemic, we do get cranky when we need to eat.

I also know my kids well enough (especially my oldest) that when they haven't eaten in a while and begin to get crabby, I should fuel them first, then talk. Otherwise the conversation degenerates into whining and confusion because my kids don't understand they are hungry.

I think we need to give Kate some slack here. I'm guessing she understands Mady's needs and is attending to them. I'm not giving her a complete pass, I just understand where she is coming from on this issue.

Anonymous said...

Thanks Penny. I am a RN and specialize in working with diabetic children and it bothers me when she says that also. Maybe a better thing to say is "maybe they are hungry." And like you said, listening to them and finding out what is wrong is always a great idea too. It sounds like you are well informed on your son's condition and are doing a great job because believe me, many parents are not. Best to you and your son.

Anonymous said...

Excellent post. I fully understand the ramifications of Type 1 Diabetes and it should not be taken lightly. Your story is another example of how Kate Gosselin uses any excuse she can to avoid being a mother to her children. For being a nurse, she is not very educated on health issues. I am beginning to wonder if she really is a RN or perhaps just an LVN.
I feel for you and your son and wish you the best.

Kristee said...

Excellent post, thank you!!

Kate has driven me up a wall with this statement as well! My daughter does have hypoglycemia and does not have diabetes. She went through tons of testing when she was 3. She's now 16 and she's learned to live with it. Her symptoms never included wild tantrums and bad behavior. For her it is almost completely opposite of that. She gets very quiet, clammy, and she will start to panic. A juice box, soda, or anything with a high dose of sugar brings her right back.

Kate is an idiot using this excuse for her children's bad behavior. Unless they have all had extensive testing for hypoglycemia then she needs shut up. I'm not sure why she would use this time and time again, but I guess it's better than owning up to the fact that she's the one effing up her children.

Anonymous said...

Penny,
Thank you for saying what I have been thinking. I have two people in my family who have low blood sugar. When I first heard Kate mention low blood sugar I was wondering why she was feeding them pancakes and sticky buns for breakfast, I didn't realize she was just throwing that term around. For a woman who is supposed to have been a nurse, Kate doesn't seem to have too much sense, I thought part of her training would have been to be sensitive to others and their conditions, I guess she missed that part.

Anonymous said...

Anon 6:07am, I understand what you are saying. When the body is hungry, sometimes, getting frustrated/whiny is part of it. I remember when I was pregnant and we were out of the house, my husband understood that I would put my foot down and ask to stop what we were doing because I needed food, right now! I would get cranky and he knew that it was important to feed me and I'm a grown adult! Haven't any of you become cranky when overly hungry??
On top of that, when children are hungry, just like Anon 6:07 brought up, they can't think straight and need food before any reasoning can take place. I work at a preschool and there was one boy who would start to act up and we would sit him down and give him his snack early because his hunger affected his behavior. Talking about it served no purpose.

I totally give Kate a pass on this one. Perhaps it's a poor choice of words, but I understand where she is coming from.

Anonymous said...

Perhaps it's a poor choice of words, but I understand where she is coming from.

One of my objections to her use of the term is that she flaunts her medical expertise and frequently criticizes Jon for his misuse of words -- and yet is misusing a medical diagnosis to explain her children's behavior. If someone were not in the medical field, perhaps it would be more understandable. But since Kate is -- there is less excuse.

For example, Kate felt the need to correct Jon's comment that they were going on a "lunch picnic." She felt it important that she say that she'd never heard that expression and that the correct term was "picnic lunch." Now if that is such an important correction -- why is it less important to correctly describe her kids' medical (or nonmedical) condition?

Lastly, she's been using the low blood sugar excuse for three years - don't you think that someone has pointed out in that period, perhaps their pediatrician, that it's an incorrect diagnosis -- and yet her language hasn't changed.

I think she wants the audience to believe that her kids have a medical condition to explain their misbehavior rather than that the circumstances of living their lives on camera is creating the problem.

Not a Hater said...

I completely agree with Anon 6:07am and Anon 7:28 AM --- it was poor, poor word choice, that is all. My nieces and nephews get crazy when they're hungry and I get quite witchy myself. So maybe Kate just needs to say something like, "it's time for a snack, my kids are getting cranky."

Anonymous said...

Thank you for such an excellent post. If anyone remembers the movie Steel Magnolias where Shelby (Julia Roberts) has a diabetic attack at the beauty salon on her wedding day. That is a great example of "low blood sugar", not Mady running around being a brat and hitting her siblings.

SmaratyQ said...

On top of that, when children are hungry, just like Anon 6:07 brought up, they can't think straight and need food before any reasoning can take place.
Alexis was sent to time out because she twice demanded a bagel after eating her breakfast of one bowl of cold cereal. Perhaps she was still hungry, but Jon didn't ask why she wanted a bagel. He instead enforced the 'you ask twice, you go to time out' rule. Sorry, no passes for Kon.

Anonymous said...

I understand how in your situation you feel upset by this. I just can't see it as that big a deal though. I get moody when I haven't eaten for a long time. I do much better with a few small meals. Just a hand full of nuts can make me feel better. I am not diabetic and have no insulin problems. I have never said these things to my children but, I do think they can be true. If they've gone a while without a snack/meal they do sometimes seem out of sorts. Give them an apple or a granola bar and often that mood is lifted. I am sorry that offends you but, it does happen. Again, in your situation I can see that it's hard to picture this happening to a nondiabetic child and it's not nearly the same as your child experiencing this but, it can happen.

Breanna said...

Anon 6:07 said:Penny, I am sorry you take offense to the use of "low blood sugar." I have definitely used that phrase in the past referring to both myself and my children. My understanding is that all people have fluctuations in blood sugar levels depending on how long they wait between eating. One of the first signs of low blood sugar is irritability. So while neither myself nor my children are diabetic or hypoglycemic, we do get cranky when we need to eat.

Yes, a normal person's blood sugar will fluctuate depending on when you have eaten. It will fluctuate between 70-120. This is a far cry from crashing to 60, 50, 30 etc. Low blood sugar is when your blood sugar dips below 70. If it gets low enough it can even result in seizures. I know diabetics who have had several seizures from low blood sugar. It is an insult to people everywhere with REAL blood sugar issues when Kate throws the term around so lightly. It is even more insulting because she is a nurse and should know better. 2 diabetics live in my household and it grates on my nerves when she says it too. If your kids are cranky because they are hungry, then say they are hungry, don't blame it on low blood sugar. Better yet, as Penny said, actually listen to what they are saying and quit making excuses.

Penny, great post.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 7:28 said... I totally give Kate a pass on this one. Perhaps it's a poor choice of words, but I understand where she is coming from.

I don't give Kate a pass on this one. Kate thinks she is a role model and there may be young mothers out there who think since Kate is so wonderful and is a nurse, that it is ok to feed a child who really does have low blood sugar the same food that Kate feeds her kids. Believe me, children with hypoglycemia CANNOT eat the way Kate's children do without some major problems.

hellokitty said...

'I don't think she's comfortable with the cameras' (a prospective nanny)

That statement bugged me too! It just is not a normal situation for cameras to follow you.

FIONA said...

Dear Penny,

Diabetes sucks! Especially in kids! My heart goes out to you kiddo and your family, and everyone else dealing with this disease.

It has always bugged me as well, the way Kate blames everything on sugar. She never takes the time to find out the real problem, because I don't think she would know what to do anyway. So, she just feeds them.

Food "fixes" alot of things in their home....but I won't go there right now.

I appreciate you bringing more awareness to diabetes.

Best wishes to your son and your family.

Fiona

FIONA said...

Kate will never get a pass from me, until I actually see her treat her children with dignity and respect.

As far as Jon-don't really care so much. If he wants to take it so be it.

I think it is insensitive to Penny who is actually dealing with a legitimate situation and claim similarities.

Yes, the kids you speak of may feel better with a snack, but Kate, teacher, etc... does not have to fear coma or a seizure. Hypogycemia is night life threatening.

I think the issue we take with Kate and her wonky quirks, is that we have never once heard her say to Mady, "what's wrong Mady"...."are you hungry"? In fact, at Sesame, Mady stated her problem...she didn't want to be there. And to those of you who say we saw her a few minutes later eating and fine, I don't think she was fine. She is just used to being dismissed and has learned to cope.

Perhaps if I had heard that ONCE, I would cut her some slack. Come to think of it, have we ever heard the kids say "I am hungry?" I think the kids get fed plenty.

This is just Kate's way.

Kate said...

My guess as to why she uses the low blood sugar phrase could be that she knew someone who did have diabetes or hypoglycemia and had the whiny irritable attitude when their sugars weren't right, thus she attributes whiny & cranky to low sugar. It certainly doesn't excuse her flippant attitude towards her children's needs when they are like that. I agree that she does need to listen to them instead of easily dismissing them like she does. I can almost guarantee that those kids don't have sugar problems (unless you count their carb addiction) because if they did, you know Kate would hop on that woe is me gravy train!

K.C. said...

Anonymous 6:13 said...I am beginning to wonder if she really is a RN or perhaps just an LVN.

This has been discussed before on GWoP. From what I've read, Kate is NOT an RN. She went through a certificate program.

(IMO) It's inappropriate for Kate to claim she, (or anyone else), has specific medical conditions, (low sugar or OCD), without having a legitimate Doctor's diagnosis.

Penny, thank you for sharing your personal story. I now have a much better understanding of type 1 diabetes. Thanks GWoP for informative blog entry!

Anonymous said...

Kate is not a "supposed to be a nurse" but is in fact a Registered Nurse.

Anonymous said...

Very informative post by Penny, thank you! I totally agree, Kate seems to blame bratty behavior on low blood sugar, but IMO too, that's not always the case. My husband has Type II diabetes, and when his blood sugar drops (as it did last week to a dangerous level of 48) he gets easily confused, feels light-headed, sweaty and shaky. Other symptoms of low blood sugar per his medical info, are becoming anxious, irritable, numbness and tingling of the lips, he has not experienced these last four. Again, I agree with Penny, if Kate truly feels that her kid(s) have low blood sugar, she needs to get that child (or children) checked by a professional. Even though Kate's a 'nurse', she is not able to diagnose low blood sugar in her kids.

pokie said...

Penny, I truly believe the saying 'God only gives you what you can handle.' Your son was given to you and your hubby because you're obviously caring parents. I wish your family well.

Anonymous said...

http://www.emedicine.com/med/TOPIC1123.HTM
Here's an article about hypoglycemia.
some of the article:

To diagnose hypoglycemia, the Whipple triad characteristically is present. This triad includes the documentation of low blood sugar, presence of symptoms, and reversal of these symptoms when the blood sugar level is restored to normal.

Frequency

United States

The incidence of hypoglycemia in a population is difficult to ascertain. Patients and physicians frequently attribute symptoms (eg, anxiety, irritability, hunger) to hypoglycemia without documenting the presence of low blood sugar. The true prevalence of hypoglycemia, with blood sugar levels below 50 mg/dL, generally occurs in 5-10% of people presenting with symptoms suggestive of hypoglycemia.

Symptoms of hypoglycemia may be categorized as neurogenic (adrenergic) or neuroglycopenic.


Symptoms due to sympatho-adrenal activation include sweating, shakiness, tachycardia, anxiety, and a sensation of hunger.
Neuroglycopenic symptoms include weakness, tiredness, or dizziness; inappropriate behavior (sometimes mistaken for inebriation), difficulty with concentration; confusion; blurred vision; and, in extreme cases, coma and death.
The timing of onset of these symptoms relative to the time of meal ingestion is crucial in the evaluation of a patient with hypoglycemia. Fasting hypoglycemia typically occurs in the morning before eating or during the day, particularly in the afternoon if meals are missed or delayed. Postprandial hyperglycemia typically occurs 2-4 hours after eating food, especially when meals contain high levels of simple carbohydrates. Postprandial symptoms are typically due to reactive causes, but some patients with insulinoma also may present with postprandial symptoms. About 4-6 hours after food ingestion, plasma glucose concentrations are 80-90 mg/dL, and rates of glucose utilization and production are approximately 2 mg/kg/min. Glucose production is primarily (70-80%) from hepatic glycogenolysis, with a lesser contribution (20-25%) from hepatic gluconeogenesis.


Those kids don't seem to be having issues with low blood sugar and if they were Kate being a nurse should have them worked up because there are serious diseases related to hypoglycemia. I know this was a fad disease for a while but unless you are diagnosed by a doctor then claiming you have low blood sugar is just a cop out for being cranky in my book. I've no problem saying I'm feeling out of sorts can we sit and have a bite to eat. But then again I'm an adult. If a child is tired and needs a sit down they do tend to whine but it's just being a child not an illness.

minxie said...

Thank you for your post. Kate should stop feeding her kids those carb-heavy meals and up the protein. Although I know it's true, I find it hard to believe she has any kind of nursing or quasi-medical training because she sounds completely clueless on various medical/health/nutrition topics.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your post. I have a pet peeve about people using the "low blood sugar" excuse for themselves or their kids' irritable behavior when they are usually just in a bad mood or hungry.

Anonymous said...

I too give Kate a pass on this one. I think it is a common phrase when someone is irritable. Some say you need sugar, other say you need food. Irritability is in fact one of the first signs that sugar is on the downward spiral so when she notices the kids getting antsy and whiny like they do she is probably right that it is time to eat. It seems like she only mentions it near mealtime. I am a hypoglycemic myself and it really doesn't offend me.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous 6:13 said...I am beginning to wonder if she really is a RN or perhaps just an LVN.

This has been discussed before on GWoP. From what I've read, Kate is NOT an RN. She went through a certificate program

Kate actually is an RN and I am 100% certain of that. We went to the same nursing school but luckily were in a different graduating class by quite a few yrs. She worked as a maternity nurse. How she became such a germaphobe is beyond me.

hellokitty said...

"How she became such a germaphobe is beyond me."

Sometimes I wonder if she really is a germaphobe or if she even has OCD. I understand that not everyone can be lumped into a particular group, but with Kate I think it is more about control than anything else.

Examples:
*No toilet paper is ever seen near those little potties.The kids just seem to get up and walk away after they're done.
*Clipping Aaden's nails at the table while him and other kids were eating.
*Brushing hair in the kitchen.
*Taking out Jon's staples at the table.
*She said that she cleans everything, but how come when the furniture is moved there are always dust bunnies under it? To me, that is normal. But Kate acts like all she does is constantly clean when that isn't the case.
*Potties aren't emptied until the end of the day. When there are talks of overflow, something is wrong.

Anonymous said...

"How she became such a germaphobe is beyond me."

Kate is not a germaphobe. I think she just says that because she thinks it's cool. Or, it could be like her saying that she is "OCD" (again, I don't really believe this) - she uses these excuses to validate her need to control everyone around her and to play her little mind games.

If she was a germaphobe she wouldn't be able to have those stupid potties filled with urine all around the house as well as other things that I have seen on the show.

Anna said...

I agree Anon 3:20, if she were truly OCD or a germaphobe those potties all over the place would push her over the edge. So would combing hair in the dining room/kitchen, taking staples out WHILE the children were eating...I could go on and on.

Anonymous said...

I don't think Kate is a germophobe at all. I think she's a control freak, plain and simple.

And believe me, I know of what I speak.

Janet said...

I have found this to be a very informative/educational blog; thanks to all of you who have posted.

As I was reading the posts, a thought came to my mind. Can you even IMAGINE how "INCONVENIENT" it would be to Kate if one or more of the children were diagnosed with diabetes the way Penny's son was and she'd have to give them insulin shots EVERY DAY, at least THREE TIMES A DAY, as well as CHECK THEIR BLOOD SUGAR several times a day?! Oh the horror!!

But, Kate being Kate, I'm sure her helpers or nannies would do that for her (rolling my eyes here).

laura linger said...

Penny:

God bless you and your son. What an amazing post. Thank you for sharing your story and your real struggles with low blood sugar. I, too, have some difficulties in that area, but I am not a child, and I have nothing near to what your darling son contends with.

I'll remember you both in my prayers tonight. :-)

maggietoo said...

I am with you on this one, Penny. As a Type I, insulin pump-wearing diabetic, my hackles also go up at such a throw-away comment from someone who claims to be medically educated. I have never had a tantrum due to a low blood sugar; more like a quiet panic, or the instinctual survival mode kicking in.

As someone who has had to learn a lot about carbohydrates and their effect, I have always been confused as to why a nurse and a self-professed organic "cook" who, you would think, has more than a passing interest in nutrition, would load those darling kids up on straight carb meals and drinks and not be aware that she is creating a resulting blood sugar spike and subsequent fall, even within the normal range of blood sugars.

Your son is fortunate to have you. I will visit your blog. I pass along to you one of my favorite quotes: "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass -- it's about learning how to dance in the rain."

Jodie said...

Great post Penny. My seven year old was diagnosed at three with Type 1 as well. I can relate to your anger at Kate's insensitive comments. Those of you that "give her a pass" are so fortunate that you have never had to hold your child's head in your lap while you sit on the floor at the grocery store waiting for his sugar to rise up as people walk by you & make mean comments instead of offering to help you. Or how about waiting to be released from the mother baby unit after hemorrhaging and requiring a transfusion to be told your older child is being rushed to the same hospital you are at for a low blood sugar of 15. Racing (as best you can after a c-section) through the hospital to meet the ambulance praying the whole way that you didn't just give birth to your second living child to lose your first? Sorry Kate, you get no pass from me.

AireZoe said...

I have always been confused as to why a nurse and a self-professed organic "cook" who, you would think, has more than a passing interest in nutrition, would load those darling kids up on straight carb meals and drinks and not be aware that she is creating a resulting blood sugar spike and subsequent fall, even within the normal range of blood sugars.

I continue to maintain that neither Kate nor Jon has the education they vaguely claim to have. Kate - the nurse - has to wear a mask to clean puke off a comforter. Kate the nurse can't figure out when her kids are suffering from the flu or a stomach virus.
Certainly, Kate's nursing degree and knowledge absolutely pale against my sister's BSN. She's a terrific diagnostician, can tell you what's wrong over the phone. Her skills have saved lives - from my mother who was bleeding out from an illness, to a stranger on a plane having a heart attack. Everytime someone goes on and on about Kate's nursing skills, it makes me grit my teeth.
For someone like Kate to make her blanket "low blood sugar" statement on TV and have her word accepted makes me crazy.

Penny said...

"I too give Kate a pass on this one. I think it is a common phrase when someone is irritable."

That is exactly why I wrote this post. I wanted people to understand that people who get cranky because they are hungry do not have "low blood sugar". In the case of her children either they are hungry or they are just trying to express their opinion.

Either way, if they don't get to eat right away they will not pass or have a seizure; unlike someone with diabetes who is on insulin or someone who suffers from actual hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

I don't expect the phrase to offend everyone. I just wanted to state why it offends me. Like I said I've heard her say it several times before, but this time something in me snapped.

Thank you guys for your kind words and well-wishes for my son.

FIONA said...

Hey MaggieToo!

Loved your quote, alot!

Peace and health to you, Penny's son and all the great folks on this blog!

Aren't we all just mean and rotten people.....

funkycatt said...

I think "low blood sugar" has two meanings in our culture. One as a medical diagnosis, and another as "I need to eat." I think Kate is using the later definition. And as much as I think Kate's syntax is normally completely wrong, in this case I don't think she is using the phrase incorrectly.

Like any other part of the English language, if people use a term to mean something often enough, it comes to describe that thing. For example, saying "kleenex" when you actually mean a tissue.

I have often said that my blood sugar was low when I needed to eat. I am not diabetic or hyperglycemic, but low blood sugar, is low blood sugar. Even if it is a drop that wouldn't be charteristic of a disease is still a drop.

Anyway, I may not always like the things that Kate does or says, but in this instance I don't think she is as wrong as people make her out to be. In the English language "low blood sugar" can mean, "I need to eat" not "I'm suffering from a disease and will soon be in a coma."

Maybe in our language the phrase is used incorrectly, but we really can't blame Kate for that.

Anonymous said...

My 2 cents ...

I know it's easy to pick Kate's every word apart ... I do it all the time. Now - that being said ... I hear lots of Moms use "low blood sugar" in referance to their kids (especially when they are acting up). Heck, I've done it myself. It's not the greatest choice of words, and certainly not accurate in terms of diagnosis, but ... it's not a "bad Mom" thing to say. It's just a phrase often used incorrectly, and Kate just did the same. No biggie really. It surely was not meant to upset parents of children with diagnosed low blood sugar. Let's try to keep our guns in the holster on this one. There's so much more to be aggravated about, in terms of Kate's actions.

Laura

K.C. said...

Q/Kate actually is an RN and I am 100% certain of that. We went to the same nursing school but luckily were in a different graduating class by quite a few yrs./Q

I really apologize! I made a mistake. These are the comments from GWOP/These Sorority Sisters See Through it All that I was referring to:

Anonymous said...I was also wondering if anyone knows the nursing program that Kate graduated from?
July 22, 2008 4:09 PM

Anonymous said...Here is the url for the where Kate went to school: http://www.readinghospital.org/OPage.asp?PageID=OTH000365
July 22, 2008 7:01 PM


Anonymous said...Reading Hospital - it is not an associate degree program - it's a diploma program. Graduates are then eligible to enter the degree-completion program at Kutztown University for a BSN.
A certified nurses aid in California has more training than that.
July 22, 2008 8:18 PM

Anonymous said...

Penny said: So, when Kate tries to excuse her children's behavior with a "they need sugar" my hackles go up. She often says activities are "ruined" by grass stains, ice cream, cupcake icing, gum, Jon, the list goes on and on. But, when she uses low blood sugar that's taking it too far.
_________
Penny, thank you for a wonderful post! I wish you, your son and your family all the best! Yes, you are 100% on target. Kate does not know what real problems are - and she plays fast and loose with her comments. She should say, "they're getting cranky - it's close to lunch time." Or - she should ask them if they are hungry. She feeds them a high carbohydrate diet which is bizarre given that she portrays herself as a nutrition expert. I have always found it quite unbelievable that she is a nurse. She really has no knowledge, no judgment, no compassion, and no sensitivity. I remember when Collin had a tick in his back. Jon noticed it when Collin came in and got the tweezers, antiseptic and antibiotic cream and pulled the tick out. During the couch confessional, Kate grimaced wildly in disgust when Jon described how he took the tick out. This is basic first aid and she was grossed out, How can she be a nurse? She may have an RN diploma, but she has to be one ineffective, idiotic and incompetent nurse. She needs to start meeting the needs of her kids and stop making excuses like "they need sugar" whenever they act up. I think those kids are emotionally neglected. They get three meals a day, a nice house, cute clothes, etc., but Kate has NO interest in them except as gravy train. Sad, very sad.

Serena said...

it's not a "bad Mom" thing to say. It's just a phrase often used incorrectly, and Kate just did the same.

Taken in isolation, I could agree with you -- it could be a careless or throw-away phrase used without intending to imply an actual diagnosis.

I think the reason it bugs so many people when Kate does it is that it fits into her pattern of dismissing and marginalizing her children and their moods, temperaments, and needs.

As nanasez said in her recap, Kate seems to prefer just blaming things on "low blood sugar" rather than legitimizing them.

Lynn said...

Excellent thoughts, Penny. I agree that Kate should say, "Time for a nap!" I know my children tend to act out of character when they are tired.

Lynn said...

"For example, Kate felt the need to correct Jon's comment that they were going on a "lunch picnic." She felt it important that she say that she'd never heard that expression and that the correct term was "picnic lunch."

I find that, in general, Kate does not demonstrate tolerance for Jon's speech patterns, especially considering that he is possibly not a native English language speaker. I do not know if Jon grew up learning English first, Korean first, or a mixture of both.

My husband learned Vietnamese first and only had a little of English until he entered kindergarten. He is a very educated man, holding a total of three collegiate degrees, including a Master's degree. However, I can tell you that sometimes when he was younger he would say things like Jon's "mistake" that might sound funny to those of us who primarily speak English. That's simply part of being an English Language Learner.

My husband's sister is quite a bit younger and she also made language "mistakes" even through high school. She was exposed to more English and earlier on than my husband. Her one common mistake used to be calling an iron the "ironer." I would tell her that is the iron, YOU are the ironer. Yes, it was funny but we laughed WITH each other not AT her.

I think Kate enjoys being married to a man who is half Korean and enjoys having her beautiful Amer-Asian babies, but she needs to have more of an understanding of where her husband's language patterns come from.

If Kate spends any amount of time with Jon's Korean relatives I gaurentee from personal experience that she needs to have a tolerance for their English skills if they make mistakes when speaking.

This is how I blazingly feel.

Anonymous said...

The way that Penny's post about the Low Blood Sugar grated on her nerves is why more and more I find myself having to come to the table about these germaphobe and "Kate is OCD" comments. I know that we live in a day and age where we say things sarcastically that we don't always mean, but I've had a family diagnosed with ACTUAL OCD and it's nothing like Kate's finnicky habits at all. She's no more OCD or a TRUE germaphobe than the man in the moon, but if people want to think she is or call her that, it's not like I'm going to lynch them or send the mafia out to shoot them or anything...LOL. (But I will speak up here and there...heh, heh.)

Anonymous said...

I will definitely say that some people are born to be nurses and then you have the ones who go to school and get the education, but have absolutely no clue of what they are doing.

I have seen certified aides that can diagnose a patient before an R.N can.

Anonymous said...

Lynn said...
"For example, Kate felt the need to correct Jon's comment that they were going on a "lunch picnic." She felt it important that she say that she'd never heard that expression and that the correct term was "picnic lunch."

I find that, in general, Kate does not demonstrate tolerance for Jon's speech patterns, especially considering that he is possibly not a native English language speaker. I do not know if Jon grew up learning English first, Korean first, or a mixture of both.

My husband learned Vietnamese first and only had a little of English until he entered kindergarten. He is a very educated man, holding a total of three collegiate degrees, including a Master's degree. However, I can tell you that sometimes when he was younger he would say things like Jon's "mistake" that might sound funny to those of us who primarily speak English. That's simply part of being an English Language Learner.

My husband's sister is quite a bit younger and she also made language "mistakes" even through high school. She was exposed to more English and earlier on than my husband. Her one common mistake used to be calling an iron the "ironer." I would tell her that is the iron, YOU are the ironer. Yes, it was funny but we laughed WITH each other not AT her.

I think Kate enjoys being married to a man who is half Korean and enjoys having her beautiful Amer-Asian babies, but she needs to have more of an understanding of where her husband's language patterns come from.

If Kate spends any amount of time with Jon's Korean relatives I gaurentee from personal experience that she needs to have a tolerance for their English skills if they make mistakes when speaking.

This is how I blazingly feel.
______________________________


Having lived and loved as a Caucasian with an Asian man and having helped to raise his two small children for numerous years, I agree with and hear where you're coming from.

It's a double edged sword, though. My Ex wanted pointers on how to phrase and structure certain things and then would get mad at other times if I'd correct him.


I don't think Kate's corrections are ever meant in disrespect, having been there myself. I think BOTH partners INTERRUPT each other constantly, though, and that's rude and can be hurtful. I don't think the English and grammar stuff is meant to embarass or humiliate Jon like some posters and viewers think, however. Kate is just anal retentive and particular about a lot of things and is far too IMMATURE to know when to shut her mouth off and just let things go.


This couple is incredibly immature and impatient, (they had kids far too soon before learning to be a married couple and are now kind of pissed they didn't wait...you can tell...they're not resentful of EACH OTHER though in my honest estimation, they're just a little peeved at the time line of it all I think...and they miss their youthful freedom a bit!)but I think each is as immature and as impatient as their counterpart. Jon doesn't outweigh Kate in that aspect, and she doesn't outweigh him. I think that being around those children SO damned often would cause there to be some fighting for the "verbal floor" and the "final word" during my alone time with my partner, too, if I were in their shoes. That's part and parcel of the lifestyle they lead.


Not getting enough alone time together as far as THIS viewer is concerned makes both of them FORGET their manners and what is proper and ADULT once they're allowed some "Couple Time". I don't think they have as big of an issue in their communication as others do, you see. I think they are just both SPOILED and IMMATURE and rather bratty/impatient/Me, Me, Me! to begin with.

I think nobody else BUT their human counterpart WOULD ever understand or date them to begin with, therefore it's a "match" made in the most imbecilic heaven imaginable! I enjoy watching them for this reason. They both DESPERATELY need to grow up and also to learn to BREATHE before they speak!

Anonymous said...

Penny, Either way, if they don't get to eat right away they will not pass or have a seizure; unlike someone with diabetes who is on insulin or someone who suffers from actual hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

I don't think Kate ever insinuated that this would happen. She said eating would fix the mood that was going downhill. She's never seemed concerned they'd have seizures just that it might stop them from being a bit out of sorts. I do understand that your son has a very serious condition. I don't think Kate has ever played this off as a serious condition though. Just hey, you need some food kiddo, let's get you back on track. If she was saying omg, you're going to have a seizure if you don't eat then I'd agree entirely.

renee said...

...it's a "match" made in the most imbecilic heaven imaginable!

That's funny! Quote of the week material? I think so!

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...Here is the url for the where Kate went to school: http://www.readinghospital.org/OPage.asp?PageID=OTH000365
July 22, 2008 7:01 PM


Anonymous said...Reading Hospital - it is not an associate degree program - it's a diploma program. Graduates are then eligible to enter the degree-completion program at Kutztown University for a BSN.
A certified nurses aid in California has more training than that.
July 22, 2008

The line about CNA's in CA having more training in not true. This hospital program has graduated many very good nurses myself included. Their downfall came when they started offering credits and shortening clinical time. I graduated at the time when the program was a 3 yr program and clinical time began on your 2nd week in the school. It seems offering an English class is supposed to make one a better nurse but shortens your time at the bedside with hands on pts. In saying this, Kate graduated from a class that offered the associates degree. In her favor, just because i am a nurse doesn't mean that i can handle my own childs vomit. It depends on the situation. I have dry heaved already both while my dtr was vomiting and my pts.

I am proud to be a Reading Hospital School of Nursing graduate.

Anonymous said...

BRAVO. My son was diagnosed with type 1 at the age of 2. It really makes my blood boil when she says that too. I completely understand where you are coming from!

Anonymous said...

I too am type 1 diabetic (15 years! woohoo!) and am glad somebody finally stepped up and said something. It really bothers me when she blames her children behavior on "low blood sugar." Sorry, but I get really happy when my sugars go low. I get mad when they go high.

I mean, I'm sure that Mady was hungry and needed to eat something....in my house, around lunch time, we're not allowed to speak because we'll just say something ugly....but that doesn't mean that she needs to say "low blood sugar." My whole family (cousins, aunts, grandparents, parents included) get really mad when it's time eat. This is how it has always been. And I'm sure that Mady (and a few of the others) get this way, too. And I'm sure that Kate has had to deal with all of Mady's life and this is just how she deals with. But what she needed to say to Mady was, I hear you, but why don't you go and eat lunch and then we'll talk about why you're mad? Because more than likely after lunch, Mady was just fine. It's little things like that that drive me nuts about Kate. Don't just dismiss everything they say. Just let them cool off and then talk to them. But no, never. Ugh.

Jami Sinclair said...

I had gestational diabetes while pregnant with my 3 children. (Now I am a type 2)While learning about how to treat myself I learned about how to control blood sugars.

I was very careful not to let the children's blood sugar drop. A blood sugar drop in a non-diabetic child is vry different than in a child with diabetes. But it can cause a melt down or such a drag down that it can ruin an experience.

But with non-diabetic children I learned it was so easy to avoid.

I'd always have the children a breakfast that contained protein.

Then a couple of hours later I'd give them a snack,,,,something like nuts was good, or a half of a peanut sandwich.

I just made sure they ate something every 2 hours. Once I realized that "Low blood sugar" was never an issue for us.

With Kate having medical training you'd think she know how to control it.

Anonymous said...

This may have been mentioned already, but I'm sure she means "hungry" when she says "low blood sugar". Although, being a nurse, she should know the distinction and stop using the wrong term...

Anonymous said...

Penny,

I have had type 1 diabetes since I was very young, and like your son I am on an insulin pump. I am now 22, starting medical school this fall and leading a very normal life. Your son will soon learn to read his body very well. Living with diabetes has helped me to become the strong, independent person that I am today. I am not even sure I would be on my way to medical school if I hadn't had to deal with diabetes. I promise that it will get easier.

I was not at all phased by Kate's comments about low blood sugar. I've heard many parents say the same thing (including my own mom to my non-diabetic siblings), and I agree with the post above: I think she just means they need food. My little brother used to get very cranky when he hadn't eaten in a while, so I understand why Kate would say that. Plus, blood sugar in non-diabetics does fluctuate depending on when you last ate, it just doesn't get life threatening as it does in diabetics. I think Kate says this because she was a nurse and probably knows that people can get irritable when their blood sugar is on the lower end of the scale. This can't always be an excuse though, sometimes kids just get cranky!

IMO, blaming the kid's mood or the bad day on low blood sugar (and by this I mean on the lower end of the normal blood sugar range in non-diabetics) is a more legitimate excuse than saying something is ruined by GRASS STAINS, JON and GUM.